Tuesday, 14 March 2017 14:14

Saudi Women Can

Last weekend a unique conference in Riyadh highlighted the changing role of women in Saudi Arabia and aimed to inspire younger women to push for new opportunities in the Kingdom.

The conference, called “Saudi Women Can” was organised by the Alwaleed Philanthropies charity which works to empower women. It aimed to draw attention to Saudi women’s achievements and inspire the next generation to take on a new range of leading roles in the Kingdom.

                                                                                

Secretary General of Alwaleed Philanthropies, Princess Lamia bint Majed Al Saud, said about the event: “I want to give the younger generation role models to show them that, no matter what obstacles, there are opportunities and give them stories to inspire them.”

This subject is very close to my heart. I passionately believe women can play a critical role in helping Saudi Arabia transform itself over the next decade – whenever we are recruiting, we always hope for women on our shortlists as they tend to be outstanding candidates.

This is a vision shared by many leading Saudi companies that are actively working to recruit female talent and support the objectives of Vision 2030 to increase the proportion of Saudi women in business from 22% to 30%.

Over the next month, I am looking to interview outstanding Saudi women leaders to learn about how they have achieved their success and the skills needed in Saudi Arabia to achieve Vision 2030. 

This follows on from our recent report What makes an outstanding Saudi Chief Executive, based on interviews with Saudi chief executives and chairmen.  This next report will be called Roads to the Top for Saudi Women. 

I hope we can help this campaign by providing our own insights and role models to inspire the next generation.

What are the opportunities for women in Vision 2030?

Vision 2030 v1

So what is already changing in the Kingdom and what is behind this conference?

Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s Vision 2030 says that, for Saudi to become an economically dynamic and politically stable nation, it must end the kingdom’s dependence on energy exports, empower women to take on new leadership roles in business and encourage businesses and citizens alike to adapt to a world of accelerating technological change.

It is a big ambition and there are significant challenges ahead. However, I believe women are a critical part in achieving these ambitions.

Women already outnumber men among university graduates in Saudi Arabia and that means there is a huge pool of untapped talent for businesses to explore. Secondly, the Nitaqat target to improve Saudization of companies is much more achievable if businesses turn to female talent.

This conference helped to shine a spotlight on the great potential Saudi women can offer the Kingdom by showcasing the achievements of some incredible women.

The first Saudi woman to climb Mount Everest, Raha Moharrak, , said girls in Saudi Arabia must be taught that they are not less than boys and said fathers and brothers must be encouraged to support this change. She explained: "My journey started as a mini-rebellion - I wanted to shock my parents.”

Other speakers included Hadeel Ayoub, who invented a smart glove that converts sign language to text, and Lama Al Sulaiman, who quit after being voted onto a municipal council as her male peers insisted she sat in a different room.

The message was simple: “Women in leadership positions today is a must, and there should be women everywhere.”

Women taking the lead

Recently, at an event to mark International Women’s Day, Salma Al Rashid, chief program officer at the Al Nahda Philanthropic Society for Women, also said there had been significant change in the past 18 months in line with economic shifts.

She said the government's Vision 2030 was enabling women to play a greater role in the economy and added: “Things are changing so fast, little things here and there. But, there is still a lot of work to do on cultural attitudes and at the policy level.”

I am witnessing this change and, I’m also seeing an appetite for change in our business leaders who are eager to develop female talent. This was a hot topic for those who participated in What makes an Outstanding Saudi Chief Executive and all agreed that women would be critical to ensuring the nation achieved Vision 2030.

Yes, many are questioning whether the Kingdom can achieve these ambitions in a short time frame and also give women the freedom they need to fill the skills gap, but the Government has a clear vision, the correct targets and, most importantly, the timing is right.

The pressure to recruit Saudi nationals is acute but there is also a real will to do it among Saudi business leaders who want to make sure Saudis are running their own businesses. As a result of this, the number of fields open to women will inevitably expand.

Critically, making 30% of the workforce female is also achievable and this is because women want it. Women have the talent and appetite, they are more cost effective for companies as competition for male Saudi leaders remains fierce and, in many cases, they are better suited to the available roles.

Female talent will fuel the transformation

Saudi Arabia is still ranked at the bottom of the Global Gender Gap, a World Economic Forum study on how women fare in economic and political participation, health and education. However, that will change.

Conference speaker Eqbal Darandari, an associate professor at King Saud University, was elected to the Shura Council in 2016 and said it was important women learned responsibility and leadership so they could push for change.

She explained: “We have a lot of opportunities, but you have to break through and push the obstacles and not just complain. We are achieving things - not as fast as we would like - but what is needed is social change and that is slow.”

Change is happening and that is because no-one in Saudi Arabia can afford to ignore the pool of female Saudi talent.

I would welcome hearing your views on the outstanding Saudi women who we should be talking to for our next report. Please share your thoughts by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or leave a comment below.

Published in Insights

I’ve worked in executive search for 20 years, recruiting leaders for Middle East organisations of all types. One of the most interesting countries has been Saudi Arabia, where the types of leaders needed have changed as the Kingdom has grown and diversified.

Now Saudi is at a critical point in its development. There is an ambitious future set out in Vision 2030 to transform the Kingdom. At Metin Mitchell & Company, we have been looking at what skills will Saudi chief executives need over the next 15 years in order to help our clients in their recruitment. These skills are what will ensure the Kingdom achieves its Vision 2030.

To play our part in helping Saudi through this evolution, we have interviewed leading chairmen and chief executives to hear their views and add our own thoughts. We are grateful to these leaders who have given their time and wisdom, which we have incorporated into our research report, What Makes an Outstanding Saudi Chief Executive. Below we look at the key findings – you can download the report for free by clicking here

• Mr Loai Abduljawad, CEO, Emirates NBD KSA
• Dr Badr Al Badr, CEO, Dur Hospitality
• Mr Ihsan Bafakih, CEO, MASIC
• Dr Adel Ezzat, CEO, Saudi Paper Manufacturing Company
• Mr Adel Al-Ghamdi, Group CEO, Abdullatif Alissa Holding Group
• Mr Ibrahim Al Jammaz, CEO, Alamar Foods
• Mr Aiman Al-Masri, President and CEO, MESC Group
• Mr Omar Al-Midani, CEO, Beatona
• Mr Anees Moumina, CEO, SEDCO Holding Group
• Mr Musa’ab Al Muhaidib, CEO, Al Muhaidib Technical Supplies
• Mr Sulaiman Al-Rumaih, Vice President, Power & Industrial Group, Tamimi Group of Companies
• Mr Raeed Al-Tamimi, CEO, The Company for Cooperative Insurance (Tawuniya)
• Mr Fahad Al-Zomaia, CEO, United Matbouli Group
• Mr Khalid Abunayyan, President and CEO, Abunayyan Holding
• Eng Talal Al Maiman, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Investments and Developments at Kingdom Holding Group
• Dr Hilal Al Tuwairqi, Chairman, Al Tuwairqi Holding

Our interviewees say future Saudi leaders must be inspirational and able to clearly communicate their vision through a period of great change. But alongside this they must be able to make tough decisions as they drive through new efficient operating models and make the necessary cuts. They also need to have an ability to spot opportunities.

In my view, the biggest challenge is going to be how businesses transform the way they operate. Saudi needs leaders who can make things happen and achieve a new type of employee culture to deliver this.

We asked about the role of women for future success. I was delighted at the unanimous enthusiasm to see more women in senior positions – they are recognised as hard-working and talented and the Kingdom needs their skills. This is certainly reflected in our experience of recruiting – female candidates are generally outstanding. Yes, there are still cultural challenges to achieving more women in leadership positions, but chief executives want to see women promoted within organisations and also welcome the number of women who have studied abroad, who bring wider experiences to the workforce.

Our interviewees agreed that while much can be learned from Western CEOs, it is important that key elements of the Saudi culture are not lost – particularly the genuine care for employees and the long term generational view of business.

It was good that so many recognised the increased importance of corporate governance – I looked at this in my earlier blog, Will corporate governance create a clear path for Saudi Arabia?. There is no doubt corporate governance will be the big challenge for chief executives of the future. They will have to understand the regulatory and compliance issues, but also learn skills in how to challenge board members – especially when these are more senior family members.

Our interviewees had mixed views about how to train chief executives of the future. While international business schools have their place, the general view was that the new generation of Saudi chief executives must work their way across and up a business, so they understand how different disciplines work.

So to sum up the key findings, future chief executives will require a different mind-set from that of the boom years. They need to be cost conscious, look for hidden opportunities and inspire their workforces. But get the leadership skills right and Saudi is a country full of opportunities.

Click here to download a copy of What Makes an Outstanding Saudi Chief Executive. I would welcome other views and am happy to discuss this research in more detail and look at its implications for your own organisation.

Published in Saudi business leaders
Monday, 09 January 2017 15:24

How do leaders ‘make things happen’?

I have spent the last few months interviewing Saudi leaders to gather views on What makes an Outstanding Saudi Chief Executive? (The report is coming out this Monday).

 

There were two things that stood out for me in this report. The over-riding theme was that outstanding CEOs need to be inspirational – in terms of vision and inspiring the workforce – and able to take the tough decisions, especially as Saudi faces changing economic times.

 

But having recruited for the Kingdom over 20 years, I would also put the ability to make things happen as a top skill.

 

How do we recognise people with the ability to do this?

 

JD Meier, the best-selling author of Getting Results the Agile Way, says “Strong leaders are able to translate strategy and ideas into execution. Leaders that make things happen and have a strong ‘ability to execute’ attract and retain raving fans and helpful followers.”

 

He adds: “One category of leadership skills is ‘leading Implementation’, and it includes the following leadership skills: coaching and mentoring, customer focus, delegation, effectiveness, monitoring performance, planning and organizing, and thoroughness.”

 

I think the key in this is how you turn a strategy into action.

 

Richard Coates of strategy consultants, Whitecap Consulting, and author of How to create and deliver an agile strategy, says: “There are two big issues around strategy.  One is that businesses spend days or even months agreeing their strategy and writing up a plan – but it doesn’t get put into action effectively.  The other is the speed of change in business today – long term strategic goals need to be balanced with short term agility of decision making and implementation.”

 

So what are the critical ingredients for making things happen?

1. Get your team on board

Years ago, the CEO of a major bank told me that he had once recruited an FD who was excellent, but he didn’t really warm to him. He didn’t think that mattered. But as he said: “What I hadn’t thought through was, if I didn’t like him, probably others wouldn’t. What happened was people in the business avoided talking to him and, importantly, sharing risks or issues. We had to get rid of him – it is high risk if your teams don’t trust or can’t talk to a senior person.”

 

If you want to make things happen, you need your chief executive to get agreement from their team and agree a clear plan with timescales.

2. Talk action early

A key skill for leaders is to talk ‘action language’. Examples would be to ask action questions such as ‘how will we make this happen?’ and ‘what could get in the way?’. Also to look at areas such as ‘how do we make sure we keep pace on this, after the first month?’.

 

The leader then needs to ensure everyone is absolutely clear as to what they can expect of one another.

3. Get started

It sounds obvious but I am sure we have all come across managers who spend weeks, if not months, stuck in their office planning a new initiative. For some people there is comfort in the talking and planning and a fear of actually putting the plan into action. The question ‘will it work?’ hangs over them and stops them getting going.

 

Great leaders give their teams confidence and help them take the first steps. Often it is good to break this down into small stages so a major initiative feels achievable to everyone.

4. Creating immediacy

Creating a sense of urgency can be challenging within some cultures.

 

To overcome this, leaders can help by asking questions such as ‘what will happen if we don’t do this?’ – and that could be tied to a timescale – or ‘what happens if we don’t do this?’ and paint a picture that affects the individuals personally if the plan is not implemented.

5. Clear communication

The leaders I interviewed stressed the importance of outstanding chief executives being good communicators – and that is a critical element of making things happen. First to ensure the plan is clear, as we cover above, but then to ensure everyone in the organisation understands what they have to do to achieve it.

 

Of course as a recruiter, our skill is in being able to test and interview candidates to check out how good a leader is at making things happen – among all the other outstanding leadership attributes needed.

 

But it would be good to hear what traits you think ensure a leader can make things happen and a strategy is implemented effectively?

Published in Leadership

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